Hans von Spakovsky: Biden’s border crisis – crime problem in Texas a bad omen for rest of US

By Hans von Spakovsky The Texas Rangers report shows that over 344,000 criminal aliens were booked into local Texas jails between June 1, 2011, and June 30, 2021, of which over 235,000 were classified as illegal aliens. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Nikki Haley: Global COVID vaccine campaign – US can be generous without being stupid

By Nikki Haley The United Nations and other global institutions are abusing our generosity. Worse, Communist China – which is responsible for the pandemic – is gaming the system to benefit itself at our expense. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Greg Gutfeld: The media doesn’t want to help vaccine holdouts, they enjoy the conflict too much

By Greg Gutfeld The COVID crisis is used to create conflict. Those pushing it are turning up the theatrics. Not only because they are losing control of those they hate, but because it gets them attention from their equally narcissistic media peers. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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An American Bikeway Idyll

By James Howard Kunstler

I had one of those consciousness-shifting episodes in July when I rode the newly constructed and just-opened Champlain Canal bikeway from Fort Edward to Fort Ann here in upstate New York. This corridor, roughly 50 miles north of Albany, connects the Hudson River and St. Lawrence watersheds via Lake Champlain and has a lively history going back to the French and Indian War (1756-1763). The events portrayed in The Last of the Mohicans happened around here. Later, in maneuvers preceding the Revolutionary War’s Battle of Saratoga (1777), Jane McCrea, the famously beautiful settler, was murdered by a Wyandot named Le Loup—or the Panther—in the service of British General “Gentleman Johnny” Burgoyne someplace along the route.

Today, you could easily overlook that bloody history in the peaceful summer landscape. Now it’s as domesticated as the Holstein cows grazing here and there along the way. Since the new bikeway follows the canal, the route is pretty flat, though the Green Mountain foothills rise a few miles to the east and the Adirondack mountains loom to the west. The valley was once an immense lake formed from retreating glaciers. Now it’s shrunk down to two lakes (George and Champlain) connected only by the very short LeChute River within a broad bottomland that was the ancient lake bed.

The terrain is mixed hardwood and pine forest and farmland with the forlorn ruins of bygone industry decrepitating here and there. The biking surface is about 40 percent crushed stone, 40 percent asphalt paving, and the rest stretches of regular country road where a car or two might pass by you. It’s a rare blessing these days to move through a landscape with no engines ringing in your ears, but it’s also a highly exceptional feature within the ubiquitous demolition derby of our national life, mainly a recreational thing. In many European countries, the bike trails integrate all the comings and goings of daily life: the shopping, the work-places, the schools, as well as the countryside. Of course, we had to drive to even get to the bikeway.

After a couple of hours toodling north in tranquility, we reentered the real world at Fort Ann, biking another quarter-mile to a convenience store on the main intersection of State Routes 4 and 149, busy two-laners. We sat outside on a concrete knee-wall there chomping ice-cream bars for a while. The violence of the scene was impressive: the giant pickups coming in to gas up, the hordes of motorcyclists with RevZilla exhaust systems, the tractor-trailer trucks with their screaming air-brakes. It’s easy to understand how total immersion in that milieu of remorseless internal combustion uproar has turned us into a nation of quasi-psychotics.

It was also startling to compare the obviously lavish spending on all the motor vehicles with the visible disinvestment in the town’s buildings. Just about every one of them was a wreck. It’s now the exceptional thing in any American town to see a house or a business building that looks cared-for, especially along the old main streets …read more

Via:: American Conservative

      

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Tucker Carlson: COVID has been good to Democrats, it got them to the White House

By Tucker Carlson Tucker Carlson highlights how Democrats have used face masks and COVID to take control of the United States, saying it helped them win the White House and Congress. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Jason Rantz: Seattle mayor now says city needs police – but it’s too little, too late as things get worse

By Jason Rantz Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan now says the city needs more police, a message she’s been reticent to deliver publicly due to toxic politics and a militant activist base. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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A Year and a Half of Magical Thinking

By Matthew Walther

The other day I found myself having one of those M.R. James find-a-mysterious-whistle-on-the-beach experiences. I was walking in the forest near my house, a friendly little wood which lies at the bottom of a hill on the edge of a river, not far from a small hospital, when I saw something that did not belong there: It was a blue surgical mask lying a few feet beyond the right side of the path about a quarter of a mile into the woods, just past a rotting log, surrounded by a phalanx of black-eyed Susans. Some doctor must have dropped this, I thought to myself.

Here I began to imagine the mask’s owner: a reflective soul not unlike myself, not a deracinated modern but a man or woman fully alive to the Waldesrauschen, who liked to wax Heideggerian on his or her lunch break. (When my five-year-old goes with me for walks back here, I tell her we are looking for the Owl of Minerva, whom she insists she has seen no fewer than six times.) I could almost see the pensive medico walking, with a haunted otherworldly look, hoping against hope for the mystery of being to unfold itself amid this leafy seclusion before returning to less exalted duties. He or she must not have noticed its absence.

Then I remembered about masks. Two cries, the first of abject horror, the other a guffaw that must have been audible even to the shuttered ears of whatever spirits dwell here, escaped my lips as I recalled, dimly at first but with growing certainty, that for more than a year, on the basis of vanishingly little evidence, in an ostensible attempt to arrest the progress of a disease whose average victim is older than the American life expectancy, hundred of millions of Americans had worn these things. They had been mandatory in all sorts of public places—in restaurants, for example, where they could be removed so long as you were eating or drinking because the deadly pathogen would grant you a reprieve—and, indeed, remained de rigueur in airports and other places which it is rarely my wont to visit.

Now we are told that the Centers for Disease for Disease Control and Prevention, an official government entity dedicated to promoting skepticism of vaccines (not unlike those lovely hippie blogs that used to recommend chickenpox parties), wants masks to make a comeback. This seems to have been almost entirely at the behest of teachers’ unions, the same ones that were reminding their employees earlier this year not to share pictures of their foreign vacations on social media lest parents question whether it was something other than their health and safety that motivated their year-long paid hiatus from the classroom.

What possible justification is there for any of this? As far as I can tell the logic goes that even though anyone who wanted to be vaccinated against the disease that Chinese media initially referred to as “Wuhan pneumonia” long ago, there is a non-zero chance that …read more

Via:: American Conservative

      

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Ariz AG Mark Brnovich: Democrats’ hypocritical election fights – forget fairness. Here’s what they really want

By Mark Brnovich Last year, in the midst of a pandemic, Democratic lawyers and their allies worked tirelessly to file election lawsuits and change long-standing voting processes through edicts from the courts. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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