Newt Gingrich: In state legislative races, red tsunami replaced blue wave that never came

By Newt Gingrich In state legislative elections, Republicans created a populist, grassroots tsunami that defeated the Democrats and set the stage for a decade of creativity at the state level. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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The Good Priests I Grew Up With

By Itxu Diaz

I was a lousy student. My handwriting looked like that of a terrified rat. I would often indulge in a sneaky smoke in the toilets, I hated maths and only ever got decent grades in philosophy. In the end, I just wanted to become a soccer player for Real Madrid (I would have made it, if it weren’t for my excess weight and a fondness for whiskey). But in spite of everything, school ended up teaching me the most important lesson. At school I learned that God is happy, and that He wants us to be free and good—in that order.

I guess that set the foundations for my life as a disciple of G. K. Chesterton. Now I am one of those Christians who enjoy a good drink, food, and festivities. I am the sort of Christian who thanks God every time a beautiful girl passes me by in the street, the sort who sins a thousand times and then confesses a thousand more, and I whine. I am, in other words, a scoundrel who would try to charm the good God, who one day saw fit to open my eyes to his unforgettable beauty. And I have always had priests close by.

I owe a debt of gratitude to all of the priests who got this poor sinner back on the right path. More often than not, the press parades the Church’s dirt and not one line they write is dedicated to the majority of those holy men who spend their lives helping others. “As time passes,” Nicolas Gómez Dávila writes, “we hear only the voices of those who speak without shouting.” And that’s their voice. The voice of my good priests.

Fr. Manuel was already old when I was a child. He is much younger now. After seeing him recently I find it amazing how poorly I have aged. He sang during the prayers at school and taught us to ask the Virgin for everything. He showed us, with saintly patience, to pray like children, with the innocence we should have never lost. It was wisdom and sobriety. Serenity.

At my school, everyone wanted to talk to Fr. Antonio because he seemed to care as much about our sins as God does. Not the vengeful God, but the Father who smiles to himself as he watches his child stumbling around. I never imagined him with a painful, weary or tired expression. He had an eternal smile.

Fr. José was different. Those were years of learning mathematics, and therefore of penance. It was impossible to get through without spiritual guidance. He was a great conversationalist, his topics ranging from encyclicals to the most ingenious dirty jokes. Fr. José, when outside the chapel, was an ordinary guy and we all cried when he left for another school. The ones who cried the most, of course, were the most anticlerical.

We received Fr. Pablo at school with a certain amount of contempt because we missed Fr. José, whose agreeable demeanor had been replaced by this …read more

Via:: American Conservative

      

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Tucker Carlson: Meet Patrick Gaspard, George Soros’ man in Biden’s would-be Cabinet

By Tucker Carlson If you’re asking yourself, “Does a 90-year-old, left-wing Hungarian financier have enough control over the way my country operates?”, the answer is decidedly, “Yes.” …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Sally Pipes: Officials ignore their own stay-at-home COVID-19 restrictions — it’s infuriating

By Sally Pipes Any successful plan for ending the pandemic will require Americans to trust their government officials. For that to happen, officials need to start practicing what they preach. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo: Alejandro Mayorkas is good choice by Biden to head Homeland Security

By Art Acevedo President-elect Joe Biden’s nomination of Alejandro Mayorkas to head the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is welcome news for America’s law enforcement community. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Sen. Rick Scott: Trump’s Florida election victory has important lesson for Republicans nationwide

By Rick Scott Republicans have built a multi-ethnic, working-class coalition of Florida voters who don’t like big government, don’t like socialism and just want the opportunity to live their lives in freedom and peace. …read more

Via:: Fox Opines

      

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Oliver Stone, America Firster

By Bill Kauffman

I first became aware of Oliver Stone when in 1986 I was watching his film Salvador with an audience of left-wing Santa Barbarians. They were enjoying this madcap cinematic indictment of Uncle Sam’s imperialist crimes in Central America—until a scene in which the rebel forces, riding to town like a Marxist cavalry in the righteous cause of The People, began executing the unenlightened. Then the boos rang down.

Who is this guy, I wondered. My curiosity was whetted further when the P.C. reviewer in the Los Angeles Herald denounced Stone’s screenplays for earlier films: “Movies like Midnight Express, Scarface, and Year of the Dragon are such grand-scale xenophobic fever-dreams that they almost demand to be remade into operas, complete with belching smoke and lurid lighting and crimson-suited devils scurrying out of the wings to pitchfork lily-white Mother America.”

Ah, a left-wing America Firster!

Not quite, as his subsequent work and his entertaining new memoir, Chasing the Light, illumine, but Oliver Stone, our most political major filmmaker, evinces a rowdily heterodox vision shaped by the unusual quartet of Jim Morrison, Sam Peckinpah, Frank Capra, and Jean-Luc Godard.

What do you call a man who joins the Merchant Marine on a whim, runs up big pro football gambling debts, and takes the Old Right view of FDR’s foreknowledge of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor?

I’d call him an American.

Stone was a rich kid, the son of an FDR-hating Jewish Republican who had served on Eisenhower’s Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force staff and a French Catholic party girl. He attended the Hill School, played on the tennis team, was devastated by his parents’ divorce, and then went seriously off script.

Avid for experiences, Stone dropped out of Yale, taught in a Catholic school in Taiwan, and volunteered to fight in Vietnam. He came home with a Bronze Star, shrapnel in his ass, and a taste for “powerful Vietnamese weed.”

Stone’s politics hadn’t changed all that much, though. He had supported Barry Goldwater in 1964 and would vote for Ronald Reagan in 1980. In later years he became more explicitly libertarian, expressing support for Ron Paul and making a film about Edward Snowden.

At root, Oliver Stone is a patriot who despises the American Empire for corrupting his country. JFK, his fantasia on the Deep State, echoes Dwight Eisenhower’s warning that “we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence” by “the military-industrial complex.” Platoon and Salvador bespeak an old-fangled American anti-interventionism in an age when that tendency, once the default position of ordinary Americans, is a virtual thoughtcrime.

Lost innocence is as common in Stone’s films as splattered blood. In Midnight Express, the Turkish prison movie to end all Turkish prison movies, protagonist Billy Hayes is a Long Island college kid just trying to make a few bucks by smuggling two kilos of hashish to sell to his friends. Heck, it’s no different than being the guy who runs out to pick up the pizza and beer at halftime! (The real Hayes, as Stone later learned, was …read more

Via:: American Conservative

      

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